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Friday, December 29, 2006

How to Force Windows Vista Into Reduced Functionality Mode

Today at I will show you a little trick. You will actually have little use for this, but it is a source of great fun. I will show you how to put a copy of Windows Vista into Reduced Functionality Mode.

If you have been keeping up with Vista, you already have been able to read details about Reduced Functionality Mode. I even provided you with the means to configure Vista in order to facilitate via the Standard User Product Activation Website. Today, I will do the opposite and reveal how you will be able to make Vista enter RFM.

But why would you want to do that? As I have already said, there is a good side to this. Namely, system administrators can test a copy of Vista that has been configured for Standard User activation.

The actual process of putting Windows Vista into Reduced Functionality Mode is quite simple. On a system with a fresh copy of Vista installed but not activated, advance the operating system's clock by 31 days and restart the computer. Microsoft is delivering full functionality for Windows Vista, even though the OS is not activated for a grace period of 30 days.

If the user fails to activate Windows Vista within this grace period, the operating system will expire and automatically move into Reduced Functionality Mode, and allow only one hour of browser usage per day felicitating the activation.

Now didn't I say that you could have a lot of fun with this? I did... Well imagine this scenario. You've got a friend with a brand new copy of Vista Ultimate in his hand. He paid $399 for it and he can't wait to install it. You offer your assistance in the matter. Install the operating system, and then convince him to wait a couple of days with the activation.

The minute he steps away from the computer, advance the system clock by 31 days and reboot. Then make sure you tell him that his copy is pirated. Or that a hacker just broke in and stole the product key. Or that Microsoft claims that he attempted to crack the Windows Genuine Process and is looking to pursue legal action. And just watch him sweat, and bitch! Of course that the reduced functionality mode will allow you to activate the operating system. No harm done, you just wanted to have a bit of fun.

1 comments:

  1. Jacob said,

    RFM? I'll use RFM; it is the mooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooost basic. I can play for one hour.
    It'll mess up the registry.
    It can say:

    "You must activate Windows or Windows can not work."

    on 9/27/2008 6:51 AM